Norwegian Environment Agency

The Norwegian Environment Agency’s primary tasks is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, manage Norwegian nature and prevent pollution. We play a key role in shaping Norwegian environmental policy.


Ellen Hambro is the director general of the Norwegian Environment Agency. Photo: John Petter Reinertsen

We were established on 1 July 2013 as a result of the merger of the Norwegian Climate and Pollution Agency and the Norwegian Directorate for Nature Management.

The Norwegian Environment Agency is the largest agency under the Ministry of Climate and Environment with about 700 employees, most of whom work at our offices in Trondheim and Oslo.

The sections that are primarily responsible for nature management are located in Trondheim, while the sections that are mainly responsible for climate and pollution issues are in Oslo.

The Norwegian Nature Inspectorate (SNO) is part of the agency, with employees at more than sixty local offices.

Managing Norwegian nature and preventing pollution

The Norwegian Environment Agency is instrumental in nature management, pollution control and reduceing greenhouse gas emissions.

Our principal functions include monitoring the state of the environment, conveying environment-related information, exercising authority, overseeing and guiding regional and municipal authorities, cooperating with relevant industry authorities, acting as an expert advisor, and assisting in international environmental efforts.

Our objectives

The Norwegian government and the Storting (the Norwegian Parliament) determine the ambitions of our environmental policy. The environmental policy has been divided into various fields, each with specific national objectives.

The Norwegian Environment Agency has been assigned key tasks with a view to achieving the national objectives in the following fields:

  • a stable climate and strengthened adaptability
  • biodiverse forests
  • unspoilt mountain landscapes
  • rich and varied wetlands
  • an unpolluted environment
  • an active outdoor life
  • well managed cultural landscapes
  • living seas and coasts
  • healthy rivers and lakes
  • effective waste management and recycling
  • clean air and less noise pollution